State of Forests in Kenya | WWF Kenya
 
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We depend on forests for our survival, from the air we breathe to the wood we use. Besides providing habitats for animals and livelihoods for humans, forests also offer watershed protection, prevent soil erosion and mitigate climate change. Yet, despite our dependence on forests, we are still allowing them to disappear. These green giants are essential for people, climate and wildlife.
 

By assuming the year 1990 as the baseline and the year 2015 as our current context we observed a decline in forest cover in the country by 25% (824,115 hectares) or a rate of 33,000ha forest loss per year. Put in context this is same as losing forest cover equaling the size of 100 football pitches  or over 200,000 tree stamps daily.
 

Kenya Deforestation Hotspots Map

We Plan to partner with 5 selected Counties falling within WWF-Kenya’s priority landscapes  in various Forest  / Habitat Restoration activities . The counties are:

Bomet: Targeting the Mau which is the catchment to Mara River serving Mara ecosystem and the Serengeti

Narok: Targeting Mau water tower and the depleted Nyakweri and Loita forests which are critical habitats and elephant corridors

Nyahururu: Targeting the Abaerdares , a critical water tower

Kwale: Targeting the indigenous forests(Kayas) and river restoration e.g. Mukurumudzi river

Lamu: Targeting indigenous coastal forests restoration

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Key Deforestation hotspots in Kenya
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Narok deforestation hotspot map
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Narok deforestation hotspot map

 
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Bomet deforestation hotspot map
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Bomet deforestation hotspot map

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Click to view map
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Nyandarua deforestation hotspot map

 
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Kwale deforestation hotspot map
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Kwale deforestation hotspot map

 
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Lamu deforestation hotspot map
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Lamu deforestation hotspot map